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Home   »  Resources  »  Miscellaneous Resources  »  Understanding the Conflict: A ...  »  PART TWO: The Other Players

Why hasn't the U.S. been part of that consensus?


The U.S. has, since 1967 or so, strongly opposed internationalizing the conflict. Washington maintained the view that multi-lateral talks would amount to other countries unfairly ganging up on Israel, and that the U.S. itself was the only outside power with a legitimate right to lead, or even participate in, negotiations. As a result, even diplomatic efforts with a patina of international legitimacy, such as the Madrid peace talks in 1991, were fundamentally reduced to separate and unequal bilateral talks between, in that case, Israel and each Arab party. (The Israeli-Palestinian talks in Madrid, in fact, did not even constitute an independent track, but rather were orchestrated as a sub-set of the Israeli-Jordanian talks.)


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